Copper Slag is dumped in the surrounding villages, which is polluting the environment

sterlite

FACT: During Copper smelting operations, the copper concentrate is smelted at 1200 Deg C, and the iron content in the copper ore is separated out in the form of granulated iron silicate. At this very high temperature, all the organic and inorganic compounds get mineralized and produce a solid mass which is highly stable and non-leachable in normal conditions. This by-product is stored in our premises briefly and sold for various beneficial applications such as landfilling, road construction, use in the cement industry, and sand-blasting. 100% of the generated copper slag is being utilized for the above-stated applications.

After conducting stringent tests, the Central Pollution Control Board has declared Ferro Sand (or Copper Slag) as non-hazardous. It can be used for cement manufacturing, filling up of low lying area and road construction. MoEF also has declared Ferro Sand as non-hazardous through “Hazardous Wastes (Management, Handling and Transboundary Movement) Rules, 2008, Notification on 24.09.2008” and terms it as “high volume low effect waste.”

We also conducted various technical studies through premier research institutions of India such as M/s National Metallurgical Labs (NML), Chennai; M/s Indian Toxicology Research Centre (ITRC), Lucknow; M/s National Council for Cement & Building Materials (NCCBM), Haryana; and M/s Central Road Research Institute (CRRI), New Delhi. All the studies have concluded positive results for Ferro Sand, declaring it as a highly stable material, non-toxic in nature, possessing good properties as raw material for cement manufacturing and road construction.

Based on these studies, BIS standard has approved use of this copper slag as a replacement to natural fine aggregates up to 50%.This is a clear example of sustainable use of industrial waste and protect environment by avoiding use of natural mineral such as river sand.

LET US KNOW YOUR BALANCED OPINIONS ON THIS editor@tamilagamtimes.com